Hurricane Picks

Hurricane Matthew made its way into my life a few days ago. I live in a coastal town, and I knew the effects would be severe. Classes were canceled, water and supplies were purchased, and evacuation plans were made. One of the steps I took to prepare for the hurricane was a lengthy visit to the local library, and Barnes and Noble. I knew I most likely would not have power for a few days, and I needed some way to pass the time! These are the books I chose to accompany me in the storm. I have included the summary of each book; if you find them interesting, check them out! I love it when I am reading the same books as you guys. I am partially through each book (I have an odd habit of reading too many books at once), and I can do a review of these books once I’ve finished them. If you are interested in seeing a review on any of these books, just let me know in the comments. 🙂

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 The Night Circus

“The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.”

The Geek Feminist Revolution

“A powerful collection of essays on feminism, geek culture, and a writer’s journey, from one of the most important new voices in genre.

The Geek Feminist Revolution is a collection of essays by double Hugo Award-winning essayist and science fiction and fantasy novelist Kameron Hurley.

The book collects dozens of Hurley’s essays on feminism, geek culture, and her experiences and insights as a genre writer, including “We Have Always Fought,” which won the 2014 Hugo for Best Related Work. The Geek Feminist Revolution will also feature several entirely new essays written specifically for this volume.

Unapologetically outspoken, Hurley has contributed essays to The Atlantic, Locus Magazine, Tor.com,and elsewhere on the rise of women in genre, her passion for SF/F, and the diversification of publishing.”

What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours

 “Playful, ambitious, and exquisitely imagined, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours is cleverly built around the idea of keys, literal and metaphorical. The key to a house, the key to a heart, the key to a secret—Oyeyemi’s keys not only unlock elements of her characters’ lives, they promise further labyrinths on the other side. In “Books and Roses” one special key opens a library, a garden, and clues to at least two lovers’ fates. In “Is Your Blood as Red as This?” an unlikely key opens the heart of a student at a puppeteering school. “‘Sorry’ Doesn’t Sweeten Her Tea” involves a “house of locks,” where doors can be closed only with a key—with surprising, unobservable developments. And in “If a Book Is Locked There’s Probably a Good Reason for That Don’t You Think,” a key keeps a mystical diary locked (for good reason).

From the cafés of Paris to the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, Jennifer and Katie take on Europe one city at a time, united by their desire to see the world and spend precious time together. In this heartwarming generational love story, Jennifer reveals how their adventures helped vanquish her fear of dying…for the sake of living.”

The Handmaid’s Tale

 “In the world of the near future, who will control women’s bodies?

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are only valued if their ovaries are viable.

Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now….

Funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing, The Handmaid’s Tale is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and tour de force.”

Gone Girl

“On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer? ”

An Accident of Stars

“When Saffron Coulter stumbles through a hole in reality, she finds herself trapped in Kena, a magical realm on the brink of civil war.

There, her fate becomes intertwined with that of three very different women: Zech, the fast-thinking acolyte of a cunning, powerful exile; Viya, the spoiled, runaway consort of the empire-building ruler, Vex Leoden; and Gwen, an Earth-born worldwalker whose greatest regret is putting Leoden on the throne. But Leoden has allies, too, chief among them the Vex’Mara Kadeja, a dangerous ex-priestess who shares his dreams of conquest.

Pursued by Leoden and aided by the Shavaktiin, a secretive order of storytellers and my

stics, the rebels flee to Veksh, a neighboring matriarchy ruled by the fearsome Council of Queens. Saffron is out of her world and out of her depth, but the further she travels, the more she finds herself bound to her friends with ties of blood and magic.

Can one girl – an accidental worldwalker – really be the key to saving Kena? Or will she just die trying?”

I am loving these books so far! Thankfully, my apartment now has power – but that won’t stop me from finishing my hurricane picks. 😉 What books would you read if your power went out?

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6 thoughts on “Hurricane Picks

  1. You picked up a such a variety of genres – I always tend to stick with easy chick lit but it’s a good idea to switch it up.
    I’ve read Gone Girl and really enjoyed it. I also read The Handmaid’s Tail ages ago – it’s disturbing but very interesting.
    Adding the Night Circus to my Must Read List!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you! I am safe; the area is pretty battered, but my apartment is fine – thank goodness. I really do love a wide range of genres. I used to pretty much exclusively read fantasy, but I decided to branch out a few months ago. It was such a good decision; I ended up loving books that I otherwise would have never read!

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  2. I remember absolutely LOVING “The Night Circus” when I read it and my mum really liked it too! I’m reading “What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours” as well this month, though I haven’t actually started it yet…I really need to get around to doing that.
    Stay safe! 🙂

    Like

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